Drug dog led to 700g of cannabis

Written by admin on 05/07/2018 Categories: 南京夜网

A POLICE raid on an East Albury residence last year involving a drug detection dog led to the discovery of more than 700 grams of cannabis, a court has heard.
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Police executed a warrant at the home of Sarah Lynn Moreland and her partner, Matthew Brosolo, about 11.30am on June 11.

They were told the search was being recorded on both audio and video.

Both admitted there was cannabis in a kitchen cupboard and another cupboard in the lounge room.

Moreland, 29, of Affleck Street, pleaded guilty in Albury Local Court to a charge of supplying a prohibited drug.

Charges of dealing with the proceeds of crime and two counts of drug possession were withdrawn by police.

Magistrate Brian Van Zuylen put Moreland on an 18-month bond and fined her $1500.

The court was told by police that a drug dog was used when searching the premises and made a number of indications relating to the presence of drugs.

A large amount of cannabis was found in a lounge room cupboard and kitchen cupboard.

Included was cannabis seeds.

Three large bags of cannabis were found in the freezer compartment of the fridge along with drug paraphernalia.

The cannabis was weighed at 710.7 grams.

Brosolo was interviewed about the cannabis and admitted using it for pain relief.

Moreland told police she was a regular user of cannabis.

She admitted supplying friends when they attended her premises and sharing it with her partner.

DNA samples were obtained from both as part of the investigation.

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Melbourne City coach John van ‘t Schip laments slow start as team manages a draw

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Melbourne City played poorly and were fortunate enough to go home from Western Sydney with a point thanks to a wonderful long range drive from Frenchman Harry Novillo.
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Just ask coach John van ‘t Schip, who didn’t try to beat around the bush when he was asked about his side’s performance against the struggling Wanderers, who have been stuck at the foot of the table all season.

“We came from behind and got a point. It was about character, staying together and fighting. We had chances if the final pass had been a bit sharper, we could have stolen the win. It wasn’t our best performance. But looking at the result its important,” the Dutchman said.

Van ‘t Schip was right to lament his side’s lack of intensity at the outset. Normally City are quick starters and have scored many of their goals this season in the opening period. This time, the Wanderers dominated from the first whistle.

“We started very slowly. We gave possession away, we were too late in reacting, giving away cheap corners, the pressure builds and ended up in a goal,” Van’t Schip said.

Still, the way the team dug in and rescued a difficult situation against an opponent which had its tail up gave him something to take from the game.

“We are showing that we can be a team that can also fight and get back into a game after coming from behind. In this period of the season it’s very difficult. That’s something that really adds to this team. The next step is to try and get our way of playing more into what we want.”

City are in the driving seat to snare the final play off berth ahead of Brisbane,  but van ‘t Schip is not making any mathematical calculations.

“We have to look at ourselves. We have to gain as many points as possible and then see,” he said.

‘It will be a race to the end. We can’t start calculating. We still have three big games coming up. Wellington, Adelaide and Perth are all difficult opponents. ” Ladder after round 24 P W D L GF GA GD Pts *Wellington Phoenix 23133741281342 *Melbourne Victory 22118347281941 *Sydney FC 23118443301341 *Perth Glory 2311843830841 *Adelaide United 23124739261340 Melbourne City 249783434034 Brisbane Roar 2384113637-128 Central Coast Mariners 2448122244-2220 Western Sydney Wanderers 2436152640-1415 *Newcastle Jets 2328131847-2914 * – denotes teams yet to play         

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Write us off at your peril, warns Gestier

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COROWA-Rutherglen swingman Luke Gestier believes the Roos can prove the doomsayers wrong and remain a finals force this season.
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The Roos proved to be one of last year’s biggest surprise packets after climbing from ninth on the ladder to make the elimination final for the first time in five years.

But the departure of captain Jamie Seymour, Lachie McLarty, Mick Collins, Sean Kelly, Michael Kinsella, Jarrod Lane and a season-ending knee injury to Hayden Filliponi has many pundits writing the Roos off as a finals contender.

Gestier said talk was cheap.

“You don’t believe what you read and the proof will be in the pudding,” Gestier said.

“I firmly believe with our young group and the changes we have made to our game style we are definitely right in the mix for that fourth or fifth spot.”

Corowa-Rutherglen has been handed a tough early draw and play the other four finalists from last year in the opening month of the season.

Starting with Lavington today, the Roos then face raging flag favourite Albury, Wangaratta Rovers and Yarrawonga.

Gestier said the Roos were looking forward to the challenge.

“It’s a big test for our group but it will give as an accurate gauge of where we are,” he said.

“I don’t think it will hurt us at all.

“Lavington have been that No.3 side now for a fair while now but in saying that, they are definitely not unbeatable and we have had a really good pre-season, so will be going in with a lot of confidence.

“I also think we will be a lot more unpredictable this season.”

Lavington boast one of the tallest combinations in the league with Justin Koschitkze, Adam Prior, Andrew Dess, Adam Butler, Nick Meredith, Tom Yensch, Brant Dickson and James Saker set to stretch the undersized Roos.

Gestier said the Roos best chance of springing an upset would be to run the Panthers off their feet.

“Lavington are one of the tallest sides running around in the Ovens and Murray league and it’s probably been well documented that we lack a bit of height,” he said.

“But our speed is one of our biggest assets.

“Joe and Bill Hansen are super quick and Sam Carpenter and James Brain will add a lot of grunt in the middle.

“We will just look to play and exciting brand of football with slick ball movement the key to success.”

With injuries and departures, Corowa-Rutherglen has turned to youth with 16-year-old Jack Schilg among several youngsters to make his debut for the Roos today.

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Referees boss Tony Archer says penalty correct if it was late, high or dangerous

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Match reportAs it happened: Bulldogs v RabbitohsFollow LeagueHQ on TwitterFive things we learntAndrew Webster: Dogs will have to wait for revenge
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Referees boss Tony Archer wouldn’t confirm whether the officials made the right call awarding a penalty to South Sydney in the dying minutes of their clash against Canterbury.

Archer was reluctant to comment given Canterbury skipper James Graham was put on report for the collision that has left South Sydney’s Adam Reynolds facing five months out of the game. However the referees boss said: “There can’t be late, high or dangerous contact”.

“That’s how they processed it. It’s really difficult for me to comment … because the player has been put on report for the dangerous contact. There is a process that has to occur in relation to that. Obviously in relation to the incident the referee took some action on the field. A player was placed in the sin-bin because of the comments that were made. No doubt there was some confusion about why the penalty was 10 metres out from the spot. It’s not ideal but these circumstances do arrive in games from time to time.”

In one of the most extraordinary finishes in rugby league history, a controversial penalty against Graham cost the Bulldogs victory against South Sydney.

Graham was fuming with the match officials after they penalised the Englishman for attacking the legs of Reynolds, who was trying to land a 45-metre field goal in the dying minutes to take the game into golden point.

Reynolds suffered a leg injury in the collision and if it wasn’t for the concern shown by Graham for the Rabbitohs No.7, the officials might not have called time out for video referee Bernard Sutton to inspect.

It was brutal and gutsy, but perhaps undeserved was the best adjective to describe South Sydney’s come-from-behind victory in the grand final rematch.

The kings of clutch looked to have done it again when Trent Hodkinson slotted a field goal with three minutes remaining, only for controversy to overshadow one of the games of the season.

Earlier, it was an old-fashioned ambush, and for a change it wasn’t the premiers dishing it out.

The Bulldogs produced a brutal and relentless onslaught on their arch nemesis, stunning the Rabbitohs with a type of performance that has become synonymous with South Sydney under the Michael Maguire regime.

But an error and a brain explosion from Canterbury in the space of 30 seconds turned the game, and Issac Luke, on its head.

Luke, who missed last year’s grand final through suspension, ignited his team into action on the stroke of half-time, darting from dummy half to score.

But the moments leading up to the Rabbitohs rake planting the ball on the chalk would leave Luke in Disneyland, Josh Morris on report and Adam Reynolds taking consecutive shots at goal.

The video referee deemed Morris had lashed out with his boot, making contact with Luke’s head – not that his skipper agreed.

“Can you look at the speed we’re playing the game at,” an angry Graham said to referee Gerard Sutton. “How’s he supposed to pull out of it?”

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South Sydney Rabbitohs coach Michael Maguire left counting the cost of battle

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Match reportFive things we learntAndrew Webster: Dogs will have to wait for revengeBulldogs fans facing life bans for throwing bottles at match officials as Adam Reynolds faces five months in the standsAs it happened: Bulldogs v Rabbitohs
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South Sydney coach Michael Maguire was delighted with the victory over the Bulldogs but it has come at a heavy cost.

As well as halfback Adam Reynolds facing five months out with a serious knee injury, Rabbitohs back-rower Glenn Stewart and hooker Issac Luke suffered concussions in the 18-17 win, star fullback Greg Inglis injured his knee and young winger Alex Johnston suffered a suspected broken nose.

Canterbury were also counting the cost of battle with fullback Brett Morris hurting his hamstring in the dying stages and centre Tim Lafai copping a knee problem.

“The team had to find a lot of character today,” Maguire said.

“It was a real gritty game. We were down and out at times. We obviously had two off with concussion at one stage. I am proud of my players. We weren’t playing the way we would have liked. The boys kept staying at it and stuck by each other.

“The concussion is a very interesting topic now. With the new rulings, because he was concussed, he had to stay off. To lose a player, the game has to either look at whether they have someone on the sideline who can replace that player. That’s why I talk about the character of our team.” In one of the most extraordinary finishes in rugby league history, a controversial penalty against Graham cost the Bulldogs victory. Graham was fuming with the match officials after they penalised the Englishman for attacking the legs of Reynolds, who was trying to land a 45-metre field goal in the dying minutes to take the game into extra time.

The kings of clutch looked to have done it again when Trent Hodkinson slotted a field goal with three minutes remaining, only for controversy to overshadow the result. Earlier, it was an old-fashioned ambush, and for a change it wasn’t the premiers dishing it out.

The Bulldogs produced a brutal and relentless onslaught on their arch nemesis, stunning the Rabbitohs with a type of performance that has become synonymous with South Sydney under the Maguire regime.

But an error and a brain explosion from Canterbury in the space of 30 seconds turned the game, and Luke, on its head.

Luke, who missed last year’s grand final through suspension, ignited his team into action on the stroke of half-time, darting from dummy half to score.

But the moments leading up to the Rabbitohs rake planting the ball on the chalk would leave Luke in Disneyland, Josh Morris on report and then Adam Reynolds taking consecutive shots at goal.

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It makes me happy: Nadine Barnes

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SINCE winning the Nail Can Hill run last year, Nadine Barnes has made running up steep hills something of a hobby.
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Set to compete at the Australian Mountain Running Championships in Brisbane at the end of May, Barnes said this year’s Nail Can would serve as a vital training run.

“I started training for the Mountain Running Championships about twelve months ago, and that’s going to be my main focus for the next couple of months,” he said.

“I definitely want to run a faster time than I did last year, but I’m not necessarily concerned with winning the actual race.

“I got involved with mountain running because I enjoy it, and I do it for myself and my own enjoyment.

“Fortunately for me I happen to be good at it.”

Barnes ran at the Mount Buller Running Festival last weekend, taking part in an entirely uphill nine-kilometre race where each competitor climbs 1.3kilometres vertically.

Despite travelling further and further to compete, Barnes said she was a novice who didn’t have a specifically tailored training program.

“I just run up a hill, more or less,” Barnes said.

“I have a personal trainer that I see once a week, but other than that I don’t have any kind of set program or anything like that.

“I just run for the thrill of it, it’s something that makes me happy.”

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Pies pounded

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A SERIOUS leg injury to star playing coach Mitch Thorp soured any already unpleasant performance for Devonport in the twilight Coastal derby at West Park yesterday.
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KICKING ON: Burnie’s Romain Grenville prepares to boot the Dockers forward in yesterday’s clash against Devonport. Picture: Katrina Docking.

Trailing by 43 points minutes into the last quarter against arch-rivals Burnie, the Magpies’ night went from bad to worse when their prized recruit went down clutching the lower part of his left leg.

He was helped from the field by two trainers in obvious pain and an ambulance arrived at the ground soon after.

Speaking from the hospital last night, Devonport president Shane Yates said X-rays showed Thorp had escaped a broken leg but he still had suffered significant ligament damage.

‘‘It’s probably at the better end of the scale than first feared,’’ Yates said.

It is unknown at this stage how long the injury will keep Thorp on the sidelines for, but more than likely it will be weeks rather than months.

‘‘It’s definitely not a dream start to his year but he’s not too despondent about the game,’’ Yates said of the 16.13 (109) to 9.5 (59) loss.

‘‘He realises that we’ve got a group of kids that still need to learn more about how to play.’’

The match started as most Coastal derbies do, with plenty of feeling and players wanting to throw their weight around.

Quick goals to Kade Pitchford, Thorp and Ben Hawkes saw the Magpies skip to a 21-point lead midway through the opening quarter.

But just as it appeared that Devonport were about to runaway in the battle for North-West supremacy, Burnie responded.

And it was their experienced campaigners who led from the front. Harry Walters, who was the inaugural Cameron Baird medallist, was influential in turning the tide.

By quarter-time the deficit had been cut back to eight and the momentum was firmly in the Dockers’ corner.

They carried that into the second term, where Nick McKenna and former AFL big man Cameron Cloke kicked two majors each as Burnie nailed five unanswered goals on the eve of half-time to hold a 21-point advantage.

Dockers coach Clint Proctor said he was ‘‘super rapt’’ with the win.

‘‘The boys, apart from the first 10 minutes or 20 minutes maybe where they were a little bit undisciplined, were fantastic,’’ Proctor said.

‘‘I won’t hide from it. Devonport were very lippy and tried to get the boys off their game but credit to them for three quarters they got back and got some composure and then we got our game going and we got on top.

‘‘I reckon it was a collective effort, I don’t think we had any passengers today.’’

McKenna, Cloke and Romain Grenville finished with three majors apiece for Burnie, while Thorp and Shaun McCrossen (two each) were the only multiple goalkickers for the Magpies.

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Baroque and bogans battle over the menu at lunch with Leo Schofield

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Leo Schofield has taken his music festival to Brisbane after being “deeply wounded” by his experience in Hobart. Photo: Dallas KilponenLeo Schofield, the charming man once known as “Mr Sydney”, is unlikely ever to be called Mr Tasmania. He has recently returned to Potts Point after two years living in Hobart.
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He moved south because there were beautiful buildings everywhere. “What I didn’t realise was Tasmanians don’t give a flying f— about their buildings, on the whole, any more than they did about their natural environment. Their two greatest assets are the natural and the built environment, and both of these are in the process of destruction by a bunch of bogans.”

His experience in Tasmania, he says, “was probably the unhappiest episode of my life”.

“I think I came very close to either a nervous breakdown or suicide. I just started to fall apart.”

We’re having lunch in the Bridge Room near Circular Quay. It’s a bit unnerving for me because Schofield is a pioneer restaurant reviewer, a celebrated foodie, a distinguished cultural figure and noted bon vivant, whereas I am none of those things. To make it worse, Schofield used to have his own regular feature, “Lunch with Leo”, in Australian Gourmet Traveller magazine, in which he dined and drank with the great and the good, and also Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce, who brought his publicist with him.

Schofield, 79, has also been a successful advertising man, and he has run the Sydney Festival, the Melbourne Festival, and the Hobart Baroque festival, which this year became Brisbane Baroque. Schofield grew up in Brewarrina, NSW, a small bush town east of Bourke, where his parents owned a pub. Brewarrina used to be the end of the line of the NSW Railways network, and Schofield went back recently to refresh his memory for a memoir he plans to complete. It is even more isolated today. The line has closed and the station has burned down.

“Initially, I went to school at the local Catholic school,” he says, “which was called the Convent of Mercy, run by Mercy nuns who were, in fact, merciless. Poor bitches, they were dragged out from some boondocks of Ireland and shipped out to the boondocks of Australia. God knows what sort of a life they had. They had a rough time, I think, and so did we, as a consequence. They were mad with the birch.

“When I was eight,” he says, “I was despatched from Brewarrina to a Catholic boarding school which was a preparatory school for St Joseph’s at Hunters Hill. Again, more nuns but a different order. They were not quite so free with the strap.” His parents’ pub went bust, and the family came to Sydney when Schofield was 12, and ran a “ham-and-beef shop” in the inner west “because the German word ‘delicatessen’ was not attractive” in the 1940s, he says.

He went to Christian Brothers’ High School Lewisham, where the Brothers were “mostly reasonable”, he says, “but there was one particular sexual molester who, in today’s climate, would, I suspect, be immolated Savanarola-style in Martin Place for his extensive depredations. A terrible man. But we didn’t talk about it very much. There was a code of silence.” Schofield wanted to write, so he left school to take up a cadetship with the Herald, while he studied for a BA at Sydney University. He also enjoyed six months’ national service in the air force.

“I think it should be absolutely compulsory for all young people,” he says. “It would do them the power of good. Discipline is the greatest thing for health. You rose, bathed, shat, ate, worked, in that strict routine.” I point out it would be courting disaster to do it in a different order.

“It was like going to a health farm,” says Schofield.

He ended up finishing neither the cadetship nor the degree, and became an advertising copywriter instead. For lunch, Schofield orders ash-grilled duck. He says he doesn’t usually bother dining out on a dish he can cook at home, such as pasta, and he never makes duck. Since I can’t really cook anything, my choice is less restricted, but I plump for the Wagyu sirloin because I know what it is.

Schofield returned to Sydney University as the director of a theatre company, and met his wife, Anne, on one of his productions. They moved to London in the 1960s, because that’s what everyone else was doing, then returned to Australia after their first child was born. They missed London’s dynamic cultural life, but the arrival of twin daughters slowed them down a little anyway.

In the 1970s, while still working in advertising, Schofield began a parallel career as a newspaper columnist and restaurant reviewer. He says food criticism, like drama or music criticism, is important because it may end up as the only evidence that the performance – or the meal – ever existed.

“When I think of all the restaurants that I’ve known and eaten at in Sydney,” he says, “they’re now just memories: Primo’s, Romano’s, Prince’s – dozens of restaurants that used to have a reputation – are long gone. And the only record that exists of the type of customer they had, and the sort of food that they served, and the quality, and where they fitted in the big scheme of Australia’s development from a country that didn’t care much about food to one that’s almost obsessed about it now, is there in reviews.

“Dishes were incredibly popular that would not grace a menu anywhere anymore. When I grew up, the posh dishes were carpetbag steak or chicken in a basket or prawn cocktail. None of them are to be despised, they’re all terrific, but they’re out of fashion.”

Unfortunately, Schofield’s most famous restaurant review, published in this newspaper in 1984, led to a successful defamation action by the Blue Angel restaurant, which objected to Schofield’s dismissal of its lobster dish as, among other things, “close to culinary crime”. The restaurant and its owner were awarded $100,000 damages plus interest when the truth and comment defences failed.

“I’d like to be remembered for things other than that,” says Schofield. Did the experience change the way he reviewed restaurants? “It just moderated the language a bit,” he says.

But he received a lot of support, and Governor-General Bill Hayden invited him to stay at Government House, and he concedes he might have been “getting a little too cocky”.

“So I think it was a good thing, in way,” he says. “In the same way as I don’t think what happened in Tasmania was a good thing.” We’ll get to that.

Schofield and his wife broke up after 19 years. “I’m gay,” he says “but not in a proselytising way and many gay men would envy me for the fact that I’ve been able to have children.” Schofield loved living in Sydney and, in time, became a minor symbol of the city, like the Queen Victoria statue but with glasses on.

“The tourism people would ring me and say, ‘There’s someone coming from overseas, will you tell them about Sydney?’ I should’ve written a f—— book about the place.” At the same time, however, he had long been “absolutely obsessed, tremendously intrigued” by Tasmania. He had “a romantic view about architecture” and Tasmania has some of Australia’s loveliest historic buildings. “I must’ve made at least 60 trips down there,” he says, “and I looked at houses, and I had this romantic idea of buying something down there, and eventually, a couple of years ago, I did.”

Schofield, by now the veteran director of 11 arts festivals, suggested Hobart might take advantage of its grand heritage and stage a Baroque music festival. He won support from the tourism authority, and the 2014 festival garnered five Helpmann nominations, and one Helpmann winner. “They’d never had that for a Tasmanian event,” says Schofield, “except for a puppet theatre.”

Schofield hoped to expand the festival but the new Liberal government of Tasmania instead cut its funding by 25 per cent. “We were deeply wounded and shocked,” he says. “I worked nearly two years for nothing, and never even cashed a chit for a petty-cash cup of coffee. And it was supported by a lot of wonderful people down there, who shared the vision that the government wouldn’t. Anyhow, we threw up our hands and said, ‘We’re not going to do it anymore. F— you.”‘ An arts festival needs to secure performers years in advance, he says, and can’t survive without some guarantee of its budget.

“The whole process knocked me about terribly,” he says, “and I honestly started going to pieces. I was drinking, I was taking a lot of tablets, and stupidly driving when I was in no condition to drive. I was suffering from acute depression.” One of his daughters was working in Tasmania at the time, and she and her sisters “decided on an intervention”, plucked him out of Melbourne and spirited him back to Sydney.

At the same time, he was approached by Brisbane to take his baroque festival to Queensland. Astonishingly, within six weeks, they had moved the entire programme up the coast, in time for its launch on April 10. Schofield is bursting with praise for Queensland, but “still bitter” about Hobart. “Tasmania’s such a beautiful place,” he says. “It’s blessed as no other area in this country is blessed, and yet they can’t wait to dig it up, chop it down, sell it to the Chinese. All the young people leave, and the only ones left are the dregs, the bogans, the third-generation morons.” He plans to reserve a chapter in his memoirs for Tasmania. “I’m going to call it ‘Revenge of the Bogans’,” he says.

Life and times

1935 Born in Sydney

1962 Marries Anne, lives in London

1963 Daughter Nell born, returns to Australia

1965 Twins Emma and Tess born

1993 Starts three-year run as artistic director of Melbourne Arts Festival

1998 Begins four-year run as director of Sydney Festival

2000 Receives Order of Australia

2002 Loses 70 per cent of his stomach to cancer

2002 Publishes The Garden at Bronte

2013 Founds the Hobart Baroque festival

2014 Founds the Brisbane Baroque festival

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Jim Robison was a Tiger great, media star

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JIM Robison is the latest member of the Albury Tigers’ star-studded teams from the 1950s to die.
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The Tigers premiership player and Ovens and Murray Football League media identity died this week, aged 87.

His passing follows the recent deaths of teammates from the same era, Lance Mann and John Stoney.

They played together in an era when Albury contested three grand finals in the mid-1950s including the 1956 premiership win against North Albury under the coaching of former Essendon player Jack Jones.

Robison previously played for Hawthorn before joining the Tigers.

He mainly played at centre half-back for Albury and played starring roles in the 33-point win against North Albury in the 1956 flag side and again the following year when the Tigers lost to Wangaratta by two points.

Robison was a best and fairest winner at Albury and was selected in the club’s team of the century announced in 2003.

Other teammates from the 1950s to make the side were Jones, Mann, Reg Gard and Leon Pain.

Robison played 89 matches for Hawthorn before coming to the O and M.

He took up umpiring at the end of his career before entering radio and television promoting the O and M.

Robison called football on 2AY and was part of a television football panel show in the formative years of AMV Channel 4 in Albury.

His fellow panelists on the show which went to air in the Union Road studios included Ross Sellars, Vern Drake, Barry Pascoe and Merv King.

Robison also operated a sports store in Albury with his wife Beth.

Albury Tigers players will wear black armbands in honour of Mann, Stoney and Robison and another former player and club stalwart, Billy Strang, who also died recently, in its O and M opening round clash against Myrtleford tomorrow.

Robison was pre-deceased by his wife Beth and is survived by daughters Susie and Sally and families.

At his request a private cremation has already been held.

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Strikers hope for great things from UK import

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DEVONPORT is hoping the inclusion of one of its English imports is just the tonic it needs to kick-start the Strikers’ season in Hobart today.
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KICKING ON: Devonport’s Luke BanField gets boot to ball against South Hobart. Picture: Jason Hollister.

After a disappointing opening two rounds of the fixture, the Strikers venture down the highway to tackle Glenorchy, in what is almost a must-win for the Coastal club as it’s the only team in the league yet to notch up a point.

Coach Bobby Eaves said last week’s heavy 6-2 loss to South Hobart was a “massive lesson on the importance of attitude and discipline”, and he didn’t want a repeat performance.

“They ripped us apart with movement, and our shape became non-existent,” Eaves said.

“Which in turn led to our on-field behaviour to go down and body language was at an extreme low.

“We need to move forward quickly and recover our season.

“Round 3 we see now as a competitive game in which we have to take points from.

“We meet a young Glenorchy side which seems to be vulnerable in a physical contest and lacks experience.

“However, if we turn up like the previous week, we will not win.

“We need to focus early on preparing mentally for the clash and let our football do some talking, which I believe it will.”

Devonport’s squad will see a few changes, with the most notable alteration being the inclusion of UK product Daniel Syson.

Today’s match at KGV Football Park kicks off at 2pm.

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