• Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye: PHOTOS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye: PHOTOS Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS
    Nanjing Night Net

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

    Sandhurst v Strathfieldsaye, April 3, 2015. Picture: GLENN DANIELS

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  • Sprinters have eyes on Stawell Gift

    Jack Hale could be in line for a semi-finals berth in the prestigious Stawell Gift on Monday for the first time.TASMANIAN sprinters Jack Hale andJacob Despard could find themselves running in the semi-finals of the prestigious Stawell Gift on Monday for the first timeafter good performances in their heats yesterday.
    Nanjing Night Net

    Despard, 18, won his heat from a handicap mark of 4.25 metres in one of the fastest times of the day clocking 12.38 with a small tailwind of 0.8.

    The 16-year-old sensation Hale finished a close second in his heat behind frontmarker Bikranjeet Singh whose winning time was 12.47,with a following wind of +2.1.

    The calculation of the 21 fastest times will be complicated by the fact that two of the faster heats had hand times only.

    Favourites for Monday look like being Queensland schoolteacher Murray Goodwin (6.5) and South Australian hospitality worker Luke Houlihan (7.25m). Houlihan had the fastest heat time of 12.07 (+1.0) whilst just how quickly Goodwin ran is uncertain, getting a hand time of 11.9 with no wind reading available.

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

  • Moruya races Easter cup

    Moruya races Easter cup Kelly Howe and Brooke Wilson.
    Nanjing Night Net

    Dayna Smith, Eva Urbanik-Lowe, Emily Street and Hayley Belcher

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    Nicole Madden, Wendy Walsh and Jodie Griffiths

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    Patrick Roberts and Owen Mitchell

    Libby Ives, Lindsay Pepper and Jess Afflick

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    Taylah Connaughton, Rosie Scott, Amy Driver, Jess Loo and Ashlie Cooper

    Sue Cummins, Kerrie Mars, Georgie Rowley, Barb Beattie and Tanya Fane

    Ryan Hall, Zoe and Maya Trevorrow and Sarah Hall.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    Brodie Little and Jake and Jonathon Barbic

    Dyan and Aimee Walsh and Nicholas Madden

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    The Easter cup at Moruya Jockey Club attracted a large crowd on Saturday.

    Tori-Shae and Chloe Maslen, Lori Turnbull, Bree Bailey, Gavin and Ned Broulive, Belinda Kennedy and Maddison Minehan

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  • Season chock-full of caring, sharing

    Mankia Dadson says: I nearly liked the holiday (Easter) more than Christmas because it meant chocolate for breakfast, chocolate for lunch and even dinner.I REMEMBER waking up bright and early on Easter Sunday when I was younger.
    Nanjing Night Net

    I nearly liked the holiday more than Christmas because it meant chocolate for breakfast, chocolate for lunch and even dinner.

    My brother and I would spend about 15 minutes scrummaging around our caravan at Ulverstone – we were always at our beach home for Easter – picking up all the tiny eggs we could find.

    We were always amazed that the Easter Bunny could find us wherever we were, and one year we even swore we saw traces of the magical creature and his helpers.

    Pawprints were all over the fence behind our caravan.

    There were big prints, which were the Easter Bunny’s, our detective little minds uncovered, and the small prints were his helpers.

    (He needs helpers to do it all in the one night!)

    About seven years later, Mum and Dad told us the prints were actually from our greasy hands touching the fence while playing tag the previous day.

    We didn’t believe them. “It was definitely the Easter Bunny,” we thought.

    A lot has changed since those egg-hunting days, but the one tradition that remains is spending time with family and friends and sharing.

    Most people celebrate Easter for different reasons – perhaps the most important thing is it’s a time to appreciate the gift of sharing.

    Whether that’s sharing Easter eggs, sharing thanks, sharing the roads safely with other drivers, or just sharing stories with one another.

    Yes, the holiday has become a bit too commercialised.

    Seeing Easter eggs in supermarkets straight after Christmas freaks me out a bit.

    But at the same time, many retail outlets are simple “sharing” the love.

    On social media in the past few days I’ve seen many retail stores sharing pictures or post saving “20 per cent off, Happy Easter.”

    While technically they are cashing in on a Christian holiday, they are also doing something important – sharing.

    It’s important to think of the act of sharing especially at a time like Easter.

    Maybe this Easter, I may even share some of my Easter chocolates, but you’d have to be lucky.

    Happy Easter, everyone.

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

  • Winning is uplifting but nastiness is a curve ball

    Mark Baker says: Australian cricketers are damned if they do and damned if they don’t: criticised if they fail to win and criticised if they do not win in the “correct” manner.LAST Sunday, the Australian cricket team produced a stunning sporting performance to raise the World Cup.
    Nanjing Night Net

    It was the fifth time Australia had won the tournament and the boys did it easily in the end, winning by seven wickets against New Zealand at the MCG.

    They were lauded in many circles for their skill but they were also lambasted for being poor winners.

    The Black Caps, on the other hand, were championed for their good sportsmanship and for how honourable they were in defeat.

    Australian cricketers are damned if they do and damned if they don’t: criticised if they fail to win and criticised if they do not win in the “correct” manner.

    Former Australian captain Steve Waugh popularised the idea of “mental disintegration” of opponents on the field.

    Cricket is a game of such intense concentration that getting under their opponents’ skin or in their head creates extra pressure, causing mistakes.

    Perhaps the greatest exponent of that theory was heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali.

    His verbal ripostes were as legendary as his dancing feet and lighting fast hands.

    Ali had a wit and charm that no sportsman has had since.

    “I’m so fast that last night I turned off the light switch in my hotel room and was in bed before the room was dark,” he famously told an enraptured press conference.

    Some credit him with inventing the idea of rap music with his rhyming boasts.

    “I done wrestled with an alligator, I done tussled with a whale; handcuffed lightning, thrown thunder in jail; only last week, I murdered a rock, injured a stone, hospitalised a brick; I’m so mean I make medicine sick,” he said of his newest training regime.

    But Ali’s taunt could be cruel. He ridiculed George Forman for being “too ugly to be world champ” and repeatedly called Joe Frazier an “Uncle Tom” and a “gorilla” who was “so ugly his face should be donated to the bureau of wildlife”.

    Frazier never forgave Ali and never really got over the public ridicule.

    Sport has thankfully moved on from such deliberate offence.

    But in an increasingly politically correct world that permeates the sports field as much as a section of society, an exuberant send-off after a wicket becomes a capital offence.

    That is not to say it’s acceptable or to be encouraged, but in the crucible of such intense pressure, it is understandable.

    There were, however, times when the behaviour of certain players in the Australian cricket side crossed the line and became boorish.

    David Warner seems to be chief antagonist of most of the skirmishes, and his “Speak English” run-in with Rohit Sharma, however he tried to spin it, was simply ugly and unnecessary.

    Yet for all the words typed disapprovingly into the comment sections of websites around the nation about how it set a terrible example for children, the simple fact of the matter is the Australian cricket team was relentless in pursuit of its goals.

    That, in itself, is not a terrible lesson.

    We should always encourage fair play and sportsmanship but that does not have to come at the expense of trying to be the best.

    If one was looking for an example of good sportsmanship, one could probably not go past Launceston lad George Bailey.

    Dropped from the side on the return of captain Michael Clarke despite captaining the team to its first win and scoring a half-century, Bailey sat on the sideline for all but one game.

    When interviewed moments after the match, he spoke about just how proud he was to be part of the squad.

    That, and he wore his substitute singlet to the fans session the next day.

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

  • Graeme Innes says ‘appalling’ cage practice not one-off, calls for inquiry on education of children with disabilities

    The ACT government has ordered an independent investigation into the treatment of children with disabilities in Australian schools. Photo: Virginia Star Graeme Innes, former Disability Discrimination Commissioner. Photo: Andrew Meares
    Nanjing Night Net

    In the wake of revelations an autistic Canberra student was confined in a cage-like structure, former disability discrimination commissioner Graeme Innes says such abuses are widespread and has called for a broad inquiry into the treatment of children with disabilities in the nation’s schools.

    Opposition Leader Bill Shorten immediately backed Mr Innes’ call, declaring: “we cannot assume this is a one off case”.

    Mr Innes, who served as the nation’s disability discrimination commissioner from 2005 until last year, said such “appalling” incidents were not confined to the ACT.

    “It’s not an isolated incident,” he told Fairfax Media. “I hear about these incidents relatively regularly. I think there is a need to look at it far more broadly than just in the ACT.”

    Mr Innes said while he did not want to excuse the ACT case, it was an example of the impact of  “a serious lack of resources to support kids with disabilities in education systems around the country”.

    “I think it would be a mistake to think that this problem just relates to kids with autism – I hear lots about kids with learning disabilities who are not given appropriate levels of support in schools, and that’s partly because the teachers aren’t properly trained throughout the school system, and partly due to lack of resources.”

    He said he had no strong view on who should conduct an inquiry. While school systems are state-based, much of the funding to support students with disabilities is provided by the Commonwealth.

    Mr Shorten said he strongly supported an inquiry, which could be conducted by the Australian Human Rights Commission.

    “We need to hear the voice of parents of children with disabilities as well as schools and teachers in such an inquiry,” Mr Shorten said. “Schools and teachers are stretched and often without the knowledge or resources they need. Our schools and teachers need greater support when it comes to understanding children with challenging behaviours.”

    “Parents of children with disabilities are often made to feel like trouble-makers because they demand support for their child at school and that’s just not right,” he said.

    The Assistant Minister for Social Services Mitch Fifield, who has responsibility for disabilities, said the ACT case was “deeply disturbing.” He said in March the government had supported the establishment of a senate inquiry into the mistreatment of people with disability which would include both schools and restrictive practices.

    “There will no doubt be lessons from the inquiry for state government arrangements to protect students with disability in their schools. The federal government will also closely consider the work of the inquiry as we development a national safeguards and quality framework for the full NDIS.”

    A spokesman for Federal Education Minister Christopher Pyne said that under the Australian Constitution, the operation of schools was a matter for state and territory governments.

    “The Commonwealth doesn’t employ any teachers or have any role in managing students,” the spokesman said.

    The spokesman said the Commonwealth was providing record funding to the states and territories for students with a disability, delivering $1.2 billion in 2015 alone and $5.2 billion over the period 2014 – 2017.

    “States and Territories can spend this funding on additional teacher training or other support services for students with a disability, it is a matter for them.”

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

  • Knee scare for Ty Vickery in VFL practice match

    Follow the Age Sport on Twitter
    Nanjing Night Net

    Richmond forward Ty Vickery’s chance of an imminent return to the senior team has been hindered after suffering a knee injury in a VFL practice match against Essendon on Saturday.

    Vickery limped off Essendon’s training facility at the True Value Solar Centre midway through the opening term. He will have scans on Sunday to determine the extent of the damage, with Tigers VFL coach Tim Clarke hopeful it will only be minor.

    “First thoughts, they [the club doctors] didn’t think it was that bad, but we will have to wait and see until he gets scans,” Clarke said.

    “He’d been involved in two or three contests, but it was about 10 minutes into the first quarter so there wasn’t a huge amount of opportunity for him.”

    The injury comes at a bad time for the 24-year-old, who is keen to prove his talent and turn around a career that has been in a downward spiral after managing just 12 matches last season. This season is considered make or break.

    The round one selection in the 2008 draft was named as an emergency for the season opener on Thursday night against Carlton with the Tigers opting for Ben Griffiths in his place.

    In better news for the Tigers, Chris Knights impressed in Saturday’s hitout with 28 disposals to stake his claim for a recall against the Western Bulldogs next week.

    Mature-age draftee Kane Lambert made an impression with 25 touches along with Matt McDonough and Ricky Petterd.

    “He’s really on the cusp of playing AFL footy at the moment. He was really lucky to miss out on Thursday. I would say him and 24 others are right in the mix to be pushing for senior selection next week,” Clarke said.

    Clarke believes there is “more excitement” in the VFL team this season despite their failing to win a pre-season match so far. Ex-Blue Jarryd Cachia has been named skipper.

    Collingwood also had an injury blow, with midfielder Sam Dwyer suffering an ankle injury in the final term of the Pies’ practice match loss to the Casey Scorpions at Olympic Park.

    But it was the performance of Collingwood’s prized 2013 draftee Nathan Freeman that made an impression in his first-up performance.

    The speedster, who endured a horror injury run on arrival, began the match in fine touch with six early disposals in the opening term.

    He impressed also in the final term – against the trend – when he hit rookie Brenden Abbott on the chest with a pinpoint pass.

    Freeman was among the Pies’ best, along with Tim Broomhead, Jonathan Marsh and Ben Kennedy.

    Ruckman Mason Cox showed glimpses with a terrific second-quarter goal. Darcy Moore spent most of the match in defence, but appeared to be still adjusting to the higher level.

    Melbourne’s Bernie Vince dominated for the Scorpions and appears to have shaken off his hamstring dramas from the pre-season. He is likely to return against Greater Western Sydney next week.

    Geelong midfielders Sam Blease and George Horlin-Smith staked their claims for a senior recall with prolific performances in the practice match loss to Footscray.   

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

  • Witnesses sought after elderly man hit by car in Pascoe Vale South

    Police want to speak to anyone who witnessed an elderly man being hit by a car in Melbourne’s north on Friday morning.
    Nanjing Night Net

    An 89-year-old man was crossing Sussex Street, near the corner of Bell Street, in Pascoe Vale South when he was struck by a Toyota Yaris just after 8am.

    The Coburg West man suffered head injuries and was taken to the Royal Melbourne Hospital where he remains in a stable condition.

    Investigators are appealing for anyone who saw the collision to come forward, particularly a tradesman who may have left the scene before police arrived. They are urging anyone who may have seen the Toyota Yaris before the incident to contact police.

    The driver, 29-year-old Burnside Heights woman, stopped after the man was hit.

    Anyone with information is being urged to call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000.

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

  • Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015PHOTOS

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015 | PHOTOS Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.
    Nanjing Night Net

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

    Dwellingup Pumpkin Festival 2015.

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  • Penalty rates whack owners

    OPENING just two days of this Easter weekend has added an extra $1500 to Cottontails Winery’s wages bill, owner Gerry McCormick estimates.
    Nanjing Night Net

    The sudden spike in costs Mr McCormick has been hit with have been echoed at many businesses who chose to open over the Easter weekend, with hospitality workers entitled to be paid at double time and a half.

    NSW and Victoria are the only states where all four days of the Easter break are designated as public holidays.

    “The normal base rate for our casuals in the bar is a bit over $18 and we pay more than that,” Mr McCormick said.“When you put 150 per cent on that, it goes to $45 (per hour) and you just can’t absorb that.”

    Many hospitality businesses in Wagga either shut some days of the weekend or operated reduced hours due to the increased wages cost they faced.

    To recoup the extra cost his business faced, Mr McCormick imposed a 15 per cent surcharge on food and drink over the weekend –a necessary decision he said was taken reluctantly.

    “I don’t want to charge more money but I’m forced to,” he said.

    Other business owners in the region, including Brian Weekes, the owner of Temora’s White Rose Cafe, have spoken out over the debilitating impact penalty rates had over Easter.

    “We work like mongrel dogs over Easter for nothing,” he told theTemora Independentlast week. “The staff get everything but the business gets nothing.”

    Business chambers around the state, including in Wagga, have been driving a push to have penalty rates reduced, which has seen significant backlash from sections of the community.

    Mr McCormick insists he doesn’t want to see themthem abolished, but he would like to see the system changed.

    “We agree there should be penalty rates for working on public holidays because people have to give up their time,” he said.

    “We’ve got a very good team …they provide a good service and they’re worth paying, there’s no question about that.”

    Instead, he would like to see them reduced with the base pay rate bumped up –a solution that would see employees continue to earn the same average wage they do now while smoothing out wages flow.

    South Australia has recently adopted reforms similar to Mr McCormick’s proposal.

    This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.